Capitalizing on Strengths

Do you feel “stuck” in a job? Even before the workday is done, can you hardly wait to get out of the office? If so, you may be in the wrong job. 

Feeling stuck may be a sign that you are not using your strengths on the job. If you aren’t using your strengths, resentment builds and frustration ensues. Not only that, you are not being productive on the job – think “deadwood” and you’ll get the idea! Let me explain.  

Let’s say that you’re a decision-maker by nature. But you find yourself in a job where you neither contribute nor make organization-wide decisions. As a result, you second-guess the organization’s decisions and you start resenting its decision-makers. On top of this, you start to dislike your boss and co-workers because you see them as part of the problem.  

You might say that you can’t help it – you need to work somewhere. Fair enough – most of us end up in temporary jobs that are nothing more than a way to pay the bills. But for long-term career happiness and productivity, you need to understand your strengths.  

In addition to identifying our strengths, we need to understand how we work best. And how we work best depends on our personality.  

Our personality determines how we perform, no matter what it is that we do – from how we organize our breakfast in the morning to how we process our daily tasks to how we relate to people. Each of us has an inherent capability of how we manage our “to-do’s.” 

But consider this fact:  While our habits can be modified, few (if any) people can outright change either their strengths or habits. Instead, what we can do is identify our strengths and habits and then choose to improve both in a way that moves us further in our careers. 

Here are five ways that you can improve your strengths and use them to catapult your career to the next level. 

  1. Pay attention to feedback. What do others say about your strengths? What do they notice about you? Sometimes, we instinctively know what we’re good at, but for whatever reason, we become blind to our strengths. It may take several people to point out your strengths before you start to pay attention.
  2. Tune in to your performance. How do you produce your best work? Is it by working alone or in teams? Do you prefer to learn through reading, listening, or viewing? What time of day are you most productive and why at that time? By understanding “how” we work, we will be able to understand the unique characteristics of what comprises an ideal work day for us and when we are most productive.
  3. Notice what gives you energy. When working on a task, does it make you feel tired, bored, overwhelmed, interested, or is the work challenging? Does the task motivate you to work even harder to get the job done? Do you feel alive? If the work makes you feel so energized (even if you’re physically tired), then that’s the type of work you need to be doing.
  4. Do not comprise your values. The place where you work must reflect your own values. The organization’s policies should be in line with their practices. In other words, the organization should practice what it preaches. If your beliefs are in line with the organization’s culture, then you have a match made in heaven.
  5. Contribute like there’s no tomorrow. Based on your strengths, work on improving the organization’s systems, processes, methods, policies, and other practices. This will serve to not only make a positive difference to the organization, but also to help you feel a sense of accomplishment. If you can feel as if you have accomplished something, you know your strengths are serving you well.

Roman philosopher Lucius Annaeus Seneca said, “Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.” Substitute “career” for the word “luck” and you can see how our strengths can be used to build happy and productive careers.

 

 

 

Value: Defined

Lots of people are talking about value these days – especially in light of Lean culture.

The Merriam-Webster dictionary provides eight definitions for “value.” The definitions relate to market price, luminosity, and denomination. From a business perspective, value is related to market price and the customer’s perception of a fair return on an exchange.

From a Lean perspective, value is anything that the customer is willing to pay for – as long as it meets these three criteria:

  1. The customer cares about it.
  2. The product or service must be physically transformed or the step toward transformation must be an essential prerequisite for another step.
  3. The product or service is delivered “right the first time.”

“Non-Lean” organizations sometimes have a tough time determining what it is that their customers’ value. But determining value is actually not that difficult. It comes down to ensuring that the above three criteria are met – all the time. Look at it this way:

  • An organization with efficient processes is able to keep its costs down. This results in a greater ability to attract more customers and translates to value for the customer.
  • An organization with inefficient processes incurs higher production costs. These costs get transferred to the customer. The customer does not see this as value.

Inefficiency can be a business killer. This is where Lean organizations have an edge over non-Lean organizations.

Lean cultures enable waste reduction in business processes that directly contribute to value for the customer. Lean cultures help businesses thrive.

If your customer values your product or services, they will pay your asking price. If your offering does not meet your customers’ criteria for value, the customer may still pay for it, but will definitely be shopping around next time they want the same thing.

Next time you complete a transaction with your customer, ask them to rate the value that they just received from you. Their response will tell you how well you are actually doing compared to how well you think you’re doing. Consider it a reality check.

Value is the key to organizational survival. If an organization consistently delivers poor value to its customers, it goes out of business. It’s that simple.